Books ‘n Bites

Join us each month for a fun and lively book club experience!

If you like to exercise your physical as well as your literary muscles, the Walking Book Club explores the trails of Vail and the themes of the book of the month.  Every second Friday of the month. When the snow starts to fall, the Walking Book Club transforms into Skiing Book Club, with members meeting to discuss the book and then take to the slopes!

If you’d rather enjoy the beauty of nature through a window, and join in a discussion of the book of the month over light refreshments, please join us for Books ‘n’ Bites.  Once a month this group meets in the Community Room to share conversation and sample foods inspired by the book of the month.


Titles for the 2019 year

January 2019… “The Dinner” by Herman Koch

Two brothers and their wives meet for dinner at a fashionable restaurant in Amsterdam. Behind their polite conversation, terrible things need to be said, and with every forced smile and every new course, the knives are being sharpened. Each couple has a fifteen-year-old son. The two boys are united by their accountability for a single horrific act; an act that has triggered a police investigation and shattered the comfortable, insulated worlds of their families. As the dinner reaches its culinary climax, the conversation finally touches on their children. As civility and friendship disintegrate, each couple show just how far they are prepared to go to protect those they love.

 

 

February 2019… “Everybody’s son” by Thrity Umrigar 

During a terrible heat wave in 1991—the worst in a decade—ten-year-old Anton has been locked in an apartment in the projects, alone, for seven days, without air conditioning or a fan. With no electricity, the refrigerator and lights do not work. Hot, hungry, and desperate, Anton shatters a window and climbs out. Cutting his leg on the broken glass, he is covered in blood when the police find him. Juanita, his mother, is discovered in a crack house less than three blocks away, nearly unconscious and half-naked. When she comes to, she repeatedly asks for her baby boy. She never meant to leave Anton—she went out for a quick hit and was headed right back, until her drug dealer raped her and kept her high. Though the bond between mother and son is extremely strong, Anton is placed with child services while Juanita goes to jail. The Harvard-educated son of a US senator, Judge David Coleman is a scion of northeastern white privilege. Desperate to have a child in the house again after the tragic death of his teenage son, David uses his power and connections to keep his new foster son, Anton, with him and his wife, Delores—actions that will have devastating consequences in the years to come. Following in his adopted family’s footsteps, Anton, too, rises within the establishment. But when he discovers the truth about his life, his birth mother, and his adopted parents, this man of the law must come to terms with the moral complexities of crimes committed by the people he loves most.

March 2019… OBOV book “The Last of the Menu Girls” by Denise Chavez

Rocío Esquibel is a girl growing up in a Southern New Mexico town with her mother and sister. She defines her neighborhood by its trees—the willow, the apricot and the one they call the marking-off tree. Rocio knows she was born in the closet where she and her sister now take turns looking at the picture of Jesus whose eyes light up in the dark. But at night she enters a magical realm, and in her imaginary Blue Room, she can fly. At first she is a mesmerized observer of the lives of older girls and their boyfriends, but as she finds a job at the local hospital, and discovers a passion for drama and stories, Rocio begins to make her own choices in love and work.

Alive with the taste of tamales and the lyrical tang of the Esquibels’ talk, The Last of the Menu Girls becomes a rich celebration of Chicano culture, and a universal story of finding one’s way in the world.

April 2019… “All grown up” by Jami Attenberg

Andrea is a single, childless 39-year-old woman who tries to navigate family, sexuality, friendships and a career she never wanted, but battles with thoughts and desires that few people would want to face up to. Told in gut-wrenchingly honest language that shimmers with rage and intimacy, All Grown Up poses such questions as: – What if I don’t want to hold your baby?- Can I date you without ever hearing about your divorce?- What can I demand of my mother now that I am an adult?- Is therapy pointless?- At what point does drinking a lot become a drinking problem?- Why does everyone keep asking me why I am not married? Powerfully intelligent and wickedly funny, All Grown Up delves into the psyche of a flawed but mesmerising character. Readers will recognise themselves in Jami Attenberg’s truthful account of what it means to be a 21st century woman, though they might not always want to admit it.


The book for November… Mansfield Park by Jane Austen

At the center of Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park is Fanny Price, the classic “poor cousin” who has been brought to live with the rich Sir Thomas Bertram and his wife as an act of charity. Over time, Fanny comes to demonstrate forcibly those virtues Austen most admired: modesty, firm principles, and a loving heart. As Fanny watches her cousins Maria and Julia cast aside their scruples in dangerous flirtations (and worse), and as she herself resolutely resists the advantages of marriage to the fascinating but morally unsteady Henry Crawford, her seeming austerity grows in appeal and makes clear why she was Austen’s own favorite among her heroines. Mansfield Park encompasses not only Austen’s great comedic gifts and her genius as a historian of the human animal, but her personal credo as well–her faith in a social order that combats chaos through civil grace, decency, and wit. With an introduction by Peter Conrad. (Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)


Past Books Include:

October 2018: “The Silver Star” by Jeannette Walls

September 2018: “The Little Paris Bookshop” by Nina George

August 2018: “The Alice Network” by Kate Quinn

July 2018: ” Like Water for Chocolate” by Laura Esquivel

June 2018: ” Bemeath a Scarlet Sky” by Marl Sullivan

May 2018: “Murder on the Orient Express” by Agatha Christie

April 2018: ” The Spy” by Paulo Coelho

March 2018: ” Underground Airlines” by Ben H. Winters

February 2018: “The Thirteen Tale” by Diane Setterfield

January 2018 : “No One is Coming to Save Us” by Stephanie Powell Watts

December 2017: “Holiday Cookie Exchange”; bring a favorite title to share with the group

November 2017: “Northanger Abbey” by Jane Austen

 

   

 

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