Art @ your library

Vail Public Library proudly displays local artists’ work in our fireplace on a rotating schedule. Public viewing is available during library hours.

If you are interested in displaying your work, please contact Sandy Rivera at 970-479-2331 or SRivera@vailgov.com


November 2020

Jessica Wright

Through the technique of gestural abstraction, Jessica Wright invites us into a world of enchantment: a world of forested landscapes that are sometimes burning and bright and other times shrouded in mist. Self-taught, Jess has been painting since the age 12. About four years ago she abandoned the brush—after more than 25 years of work—and hit upon a “throwing” technique that employs acrylics, chopsticks and, of late, her own hands. Her paintings come to life with color and texture—and an immediacy that produces an almost child-like state of wonder and awe in the view.

December 2020

Raj Manickam

I work on photo essays in a digital format. Whenever there is a story to be told, I capture a series of photos. Naturally, the subjects that draw my lens remain diverse. As an effort to bring ‘repurposing’ to my work, I have begun to use decommissioned frames which gives them an extended life and a new outlook. With mentors and many well-wishers, I have become an unabashed light-seeking photographer. I confess ‘seeing more’ in sepia and in black and white, as you may notice in many of my work. It tends to remove the distraction and further discriminate my subject in a ‘better light’. Studying photography is a never-ending journey. I started at age 52 learning the ‘grammar’ of photography. As an amateur I consider myself being in grade school. That also means I am excited and look forward to much more when I grow up! The dormant quest to shoot moments that prompt a second look has been activated as my sojourn captures continue.

The art on display for the month of December is by local artist Raj Manickam with the piece title “Festivity”. Is a Photography on Canvas, a colorful fun photo of a multi-colored lens flare  The technic is intentional out of focus on lights to create a lens flare.


January 2021

Barbara Holden

I am teaching botanical art in my home and gave a course in botanical art at the Betty Ford Botanical Garden last year. I teach accurate drawing skills and work with graphite pencils, colored pencils, watercolors, and pen & ink. My background is an AB degree from Vassar College, MA degree from the Cleveland Institute of Art, and many years of taking courses in the Field Study Institutes in Great Britain: Flatford Mill, Preston Martin, and Juniper Hall. I have taken many botanical workshops through ASBA, at conferences and courses in Denver and in Cape Cod. Recently, I have been studying local Colorado plants through courses given by the CSU extension service in the Vail Valley region.I teach small classes for adults only.

February 2021

Charmayne Benhardt

Although the artist and active Vail Public Library patron, Charmayne Bernhardt, lost sight in her right eye 7 years ago, she never gave up on her artistic abilities. Rather, she continues to paint and count her blessings every day. She remains grateful for the ability to share her artwork with the Vail Valley, a place close to her heart.

March 2021

Trisha Donovan,

Growing up in a family of painters and musicians, Patricia Donovan/TA Donovan developed an appreciation for and a devotion to art.  However, her passion for the arts percolated for years as she pursued a career in education – first as a teacher and then as a principal.  While creating- with her faculty – an elementary school for the arts within the Littleton (Colorado) Public Schools, she began pursuing her own creativity.  Studying first at the Denver Art Museum and later at the Denver Art Students’ League, she found her way to figurative and landscape painting.  In her work, you will find the influences of Ron Hicks, Kim English, and Michael Lynch, her teachers, who demonstrate movement, light, and drama in their paintings.  Viewers find that stories unfold in TA Donovan’s paintings – as light and shadows drift across the canvases.

April 2021

Jessica Wright 

Through the technique of gestural abstraction, Jessica Wright invites us into a world of enchantment: a world of forested landscapes that are sometimes burning and bright and other times shrouded in mist. Self-taught, Jess has been painting since the age 12. About four years ago she abandoned the brush—after more than 25 years of work—and hit upon a “throwing” technique that employs acrylics, chopsticks, and, of late, her own hands. Her paintings come to life with color and texture—and an immediacy that produces an almost child-like state of wonder and awe in the view.

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